NIGERIAN MUSICAL TARGETS BROADWAY AFTER SUCCESSFUL LONDON STINT

7/26/16

 

Image result for wakaa

 

Image result for wakaa

 

Image result for wakaa

 

 

Image result for wakaa

 

Image result for wakaa

 

As the curtain falls on the first Nigerian musical to make the leap to a London theater, its executive producer is setting her sights higher still.

Following a successful five-day stint in the English capital, Bolanle Austen-Peters wants to take Wakaa! The Musical across the pond to rub shoulders with the greats in New York’s world-renowned theaterland.

“Why not? If we’re here in London, who says we can’t go to America,” says Austen-Peters, speaking ahead of Wakaa!’s closing night at the Shaw Theater on Euston Road, off London’s West End.

It was a bold enough move bringing the show to London. Despite reportedly playing to 10,000 people over 12 shows in Lagos, Nigeria’s economic hub, earlier in 2016, Austen-Peters recounts how she was told by a London-based PR firm that she was overestimating interest among the diaspora and British citizens by booking the 446-capacity Shaw Theater. “[The PR firm] said: ‘Please can you go and get a refund, because you’ll be lucky if you get 50 people,’” says Austen-Peters.

Despite such doubters, Wakaa! sold out all of its seven shows across the five days it has been running in London—the theater announcer claimed on the final night that last-minute hopefuls were waiting outside the theater to purchase any spare tickets for up to £200 ($262). Austen-Peters says that the team have been so overwhelmed by the demand that they are considering bringing the show back for a longer stint in London, provided they can raise the required funds to do so.

Wakaa! political rallyThe show satirizes Nigeria’s political scene and the perception of the West African country as a corrupt state.

 

 

Wakaa! follows the lives of four young protagonists following their graduation from university. The main characters embody some of the themes of contemporary Nigeria, such as Tosan, the political idealist caught up in a web of corruption once he comes into office. Nigeria was ranked 136th out of 168 countries in Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index 2015, while former British Prime Minister David Cameron recently described the oil-producing nation in less-than-glowing terms ahead of an international summit in London. Wakaa! is not afraid to satirize such perceptions of Nigerian society. There was a nod to Cameron’s notorious comments when Tosan accuses the unscrupulous Governor Sagay—his uncle for whom Tosan had worked for as a political advisor—of being “fantastically corrupt” after he is handed the governor’s dubious-looking accounts.

The show also explores the theme of emigration through Rex, a medicine graduate who abandons his parents’ dreams of being a doctor to pursue a career as a dancer on London’s West End. Nigeria, like many other African countries, struggles to deal with a so-called brain drain of talent to supposedly greener pastures of Europe and North America, among other destinations. A 2013 report by the United Nations found that one in nine persons born in Africa educated to university or higher education level were living in developed countries outside the continent. Nigeria is the top African country of origin for international students in the United States—in 2013/14, almost 8,000 Nigerian students were studying at American colleges or universities, while more than 18,000 were doing the same at U.K. institutions, according to a 2015 report by the New York-based Institute of International Education.

These heavy themes are set against a backdrop of colour, high-octane music and dance, the like not usually seen in a London theater. Audience participation was actively encouraged, and people frequently broke out into impromptu dances in their seats when a certain song came on, reminding them of “home.” While perhaps not as polished as the fayre usually consumed by London’s theater buffs, the show has heart, energy and a great sense of humor, and received a standing ovation on the final night when Newsweek was in attendance.

Wakaa! graduationWakaa! explores themes including emigration of young Nigerians. U.S. and British universities are very popular with Nigerian students, who often look abroad for better economic opportunities.

 

 

 

http://www.newsweek.com/nigerian-musical-targets-broadway-after-successful-london-stint-483956

 

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